The Polish Soldier Beech

sevenacres:

The exiled Polish government succeeded in negotiating training and recruitment efforts in North America. In Canada, over 200 men were recruited and here’s the local connection: they received basic and mechanized infantry training at a camp that ran in Owen Sound from May 1941 to May 1942. This wood, or rather the one that existed before it but was logged after the war, formed part of their training ground. And this beech, part of that earlier forest, bears an inscription carved over 70 years ago by one of those soldiers. Though distorted by weathering and the expansion of the tree’s trunk, the words, “Polska” and the year “1942″ can be seen clearly. The rest of the wording is less clear, but has been deciphered and translated to reveal the soldier’s name and the words, “Poland shall not perish” (the first words of the Polish national anthem).

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About Dave Bonta

I write poems, blog, take photos, and edit a poetry video site called Moving Poems.

Posted on April 22, 2013, in Anthropology and culture, Forest history, History and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

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    creating great looking projects.

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